Difference between revisions of "Microscope selection notes"

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:{{Quote|indent}}I used (this) last week for counting NA. It was quite cheap to buy, and I wanted something easy on the eye. I could use it without needing my reading glasses. It was quite easy to use, and you can take photos and video. Basically, it was just fine to use for counting the worms but I would have liked a little more magnification so I could have seen them up close. I wouldn't have been able to use it for counting eggs. I found it a little wobbly - it needed to be set up and then not touched, just move the slide. Another issue was that the worms all had shadows because of the white base. So what looked like two worms moving in exact unison was just one worm with a shadow! [https://www.facebook.com/groups/678894952216125/permalink/1558359727602972/?comment_id=1559499294155682&comment_tracking=%7B%22tn%22%3A%22R%22%7D]{{Quote|/indent}}
 
:{{Quote|indent}}I used (this) last week for counting NA. It was quite cheap to buy, and I wanted something easy on the eye. I could use it without needing my reading glasses. It was quite easy to use, and you can take photos and video. Basically, it was just fine to use for counting the worms but I would have liked a little more magnification so I could have seen them up close. I wouldn't have been able to use it for counting eggs. I found it a little wobbly - it needed to be set up and then not touched, just move the slide. Another issue was that the worms all had shadows because of the white base. So what looked like two worms moving in exact unison was just one worm with a shadow! [https://www.facebook.com/groups/678894952216125/permalink/1558359727602972/?comment_id=1559499294155682&comment_tracking=%7B%22tn%22%3A%22R%22%7D]{{Quote|/indent}}
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* [https://plugable.com/drivers/microscope/ '''Plugable's USB Digital Microscope'''] compared with a [https://www.sargentwelch.com/store/catalog/product.jsp?catalog_number=470014-386&fbclid=IwAR2dExc0BB8vrOYYxmvFu8wg2SR7jAzfJJ552keVBf-xUN5dL9NHOIAVlzM Standard Compound Microscope].
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:{{Quote|indent}}Woohoo. First time I have seen NA under my microscope. It really makes a difference to have a proper microscope, compared to my first attempt when I used a digital microscope. [https://www.facebook.com/groups/678894952216125/permalink/2136351049803834/?comment_id=2149074978531441] [https://www.facebook.com/groups/678894952216125/permalink/2136351049803834/?comment_id=2149088771863395&reply_comment_id=2149115935194012]{{Quote|/indent}}
  
 
==Microscopes for use with HDC==
 
==Microscopes for use with HDC==

Latest revision as of 18:05, 12 October 2019

Microscopes for use with NAthe human hookworm, Necator americanus

The following features have been found to provide the necessary functionality for incubating NAthe human hookworm, Necator americanus.

1. Compound microscopes are preferred by most users.

Most of the USB microscopes tested so far have had problems, including poor optics and camera quality, and a lack of bottom illumination, although the Carson MM-840 eFlex appears to be an exception to this. See the details, below.
While dissecting microscopes are good for working with HDCHymenolepis diminuta cysticercoids (Hi-men-o-lep'is dim-a-nu-ta sis-ti-sur-koid) - the larval cysts of the rat tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta, they are generally not considered suitable for use by hookwormA helminth that lives in the small intestine. Necator americanus (NA) is the only hookworm species used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin. incubators.
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So, for NAthe human hookworm, Necator americanus ova, the compound works great, as everyone knows. However, both the dissecting scope and the USB scope completely failed… I’ve tested several (USB scopes) with poor results.
Bucking the trend in favour of compound scopes is one hookwormA helminth that lives in the small intestine. Necator americanus (NA) is the only hookworm species used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin. grower with longterm professional experience of microscopes who does prefer to use a dissecting scope (such as this one) when working with NAthe human hookworm, Necator americanus.
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You need a binocular dissecting scope with 10-40x magnification. You don’t need a compound microscope unless you’re searching stool for eggs and then 100x is good. 2000x is useless for NAthe human hookworm, Necator americanus incubation. [1] [2]

2. Binocular microscopes are more comfortable to use, especially for long scoping sessions, but monocular ones are cheaper, and the user can always wear an eye patch to save having to hold their free eye closed!

3. A moveable mechanical stage makes it much easier to scan slides to locate larvaeThe active immature form of an insect, or an animal such as a helminth, which develops from an egg and eventually transforms again into its adult state., and for egg counting.

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I found the mechanical stage (an extra $20) important for an accurate larvaThe active immature form of an insect, or an animal such as a helminth, which develops from an egg and eventually transforms again into its adult state. count.

4. A good lighting system. Either halogen or LED is preferable. A mirror lighting system may not be adequate. A good iris and concentrator system may also help, plus a rheostat for dimming the light.

5. 40x - 100x magnification. 40x has been found to be adequate by most growers of NAthe human hookworm, Necator americanus for counting hookwormA helminth that lives in the small intestine. Necator americanus (NA) is the only hookworm species used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin. larvaeThe active immature form of an insect, or an animal such as a helminth, which develops from an egg and eventually transforms again into its adult state. and eggs, although others say they need 100x for egg counting and larvaThe active immature form of an insect, or an animal such as a helminth, which develops from an egg and eventually transforms again into its adult state. identification. Some even prefer 200x.

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At 20x to 40x, L3s are easy to recognize. For eggs, you need a compound scope with 60x to 100x power. [3]

Binocular microscopes

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I am very happy that I went with the 40-200x AmScope! The trinocular with 5mp camera makes photography so easy, as well as allowing other people to watch what I'm working on on my computer. The movable stage allows me to methodically look through the slides - I can't imagine having to manual move the slide with my hands. And I have found myself using 40x, 100x, and 400x every single time. I could see the larvaeThe active immature form of an insect, or an animal such as a helminth, which develops from an egg and eventually transforms again into its adult state. just fine with only 40x, but I enjoy looking much closer. And having the 400x - 2000x (oil) I can look at other much smaller things living in samples that I am working with. [4]
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I’m totally happy with this one It's great for incubation. [5]

Monocular microscopes

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It's not fancy, but if you're on a budget it works well enough. [6]
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I have the AmScope M158C. Check the 'Morris scope' album in the photos section (of the Helminth incubation group). Mostly, it's been excellent for this work. [7]
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I get excellent images with it, and the price is right, but it does have its problems: I'm having to replace the failing illumination switch and power jack, and its very poor "parcentricity" can't be fixed, I guess. [8]
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… my AmScopes are great quality; you can also find the same scopes rebranded as OMAX. [9]

Digital microscopes

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I used (this) last week for counting NAthe human hookworm, Necator americanus. It was quite cheap to buy, and I wanted something easy on the eye. I could use it without needing my reading glasses. It was quite easy to use, and you can take photos and video. Basically, it was just fine to use for counting the worms but I would have liked a little more magnification so I could have seen them up close. I wouldn't have been able to use it for counting eggs. I found it a little wobbly - it needed to be set up and then not touched, just move the slide. Another issue was that the worms all had shadows because of the white base. So what looked like two worms moving in exact unison was just one worm with a shadow! [10]
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Woohoo. First time I have seen NAthe human hookworm, Necator americanus under my microscope. It really makes a difference to have a proper microscope, compared to my first attempt when I used a digital microscope. [11] [12]

Microscopes for use with HDCHymenolepis diminuta cysticercoids (Hi-men-o-lep'is dim-a-nu-ta sis-ti-sur-koid) - the larval cysts of the rat tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta

Dissecting microscopes

Useful short YouTube video with commentary.

Discussion threads about microscopes

See also

  • Microscope selection and use (for NAthe human hookworm, Necator americanus and TTOthe ova (eggs) of the human whipworm, Trichuris trichiura incubation)