Rhinitis can ruin your sex life, but a few worms might restore it

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Many people who suffer from nasal allergies know that even the simple act of kissing can be compromised by a blocked nose, or, worse still, by post-nasal drip, and this has been confirmed by research.

When polled for this study 83 percent of people with allergic rhinitis said it affected their sexual activity at least sometimes, with almost 18 percent of those affected saying that their allergies nearly always got in the way of a satisfying sex life.

Itchy eyes and other allergy symptoms can be extremely distracting and make a person feel less than sexy and, if embarrassment caused by many of the other aspects of rhinitis doesn’t cramp one’s style, tiredness from chronic loss of sleep, induced by nasal blockage, almost certainly will.

A friend of mine who spent many years trying unsuccessfully to get help from the UK medical profession for his severe rhinitis, and the problems that this caused, finally found that the solution was a few tiny hookwormsA helminth that lives in the small intestine. Necator americanus (NA) is the only hookworm species used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin..

Dave (not his real name) had had rhinitis from childhood, but had managed to live with it well into adulthood before it began to have a major impact on his life. His nose would not only block, but also physically swell, preventing him from sleeping and leaving him extremely exhausted.

He had tried everything that his GP offered, but nothing helped, and the doctor finally told him that he would have to learn to live with the problem! Only after constant badgering of the GP was an appointment arranged for Dave to see an NHS ear, nose and throat specialist, but this proved to be yet another dead end, as did several further consultations with private specialists.

Dave struggled valiantly to hold down his job, although his work inevitably suffered because of his constant tiredness. His performance in other areas also suffered, and his wife eventually left him.

At that point, he felt he had nowhere to turn and nothing left to live for, so took an overdose. Fortunately, this was discovered in time and, as this type of acute problem is something that medics are good at dealing with, he survived.

When I learned about his suffering, I told Dave about my then recent therapeutic inoculationThe introduction of an infectious agent into an organism. [http://helminthictherapywiki.org/wiki/index.php/Helminth_inoculation Helminth inoculation] with hookwormsA helminth that lives in the small intestine. Necator americanus (NA) is the only hookworm species used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin. and how this had completely cleared my own nasal congestion. He didn’t hesitate, and promptly ordered a dose of hookwormsA helminth that lives in the small intestine. Necator americanus (NA) is the only hookworm species used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin.!

“Anyone who doesn’t try this,” he said, “isn’t suffering enough!”

After the few weeks that it took for his worms to mature, he began to improve, and I began to get almost daily, excited phone calls with updates about his progress.

To cut a long story short, his life was transformed. He could once again breathe freely through his nose and began to sleep like a baby. His job began to go really well and he got himself a new girl friend. In short, he was full of the joys of spring, and all thanks to the few little buddies living in his gut!

Dave and I have both found that having these amazing little creatures living inside us is a simple but very effective long-term solution to nasal problems as well as other forms of allergy, with none of the harmful side effects of regular medical treatments, which, in both our cases, had proved ineffective anyway.

I first wrote up Dave’s story on a now-deleted blog in 2009, but can report that he continues to enjoy the same freedom from nasal congestion in 2020 that gave him his life back all those years ago.

He has found that he starts to get a gradual return of symptoms roughly 6 months after each dose, and that doses of 50 NAthe human hookworm, Necator americanus work best for him, so he routinely orders this number of worms twice every year.

By John Scott, March 2020.

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