Hymenolepis nana

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Hymenolepis nana is one of the most common tapewormsA helminth with a flat, ribbon-like, segmented body. Only the murine (rat) tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta, is used in helminthic therapy and this generally does not reach adulthood in humans so requires regular dosing of HDC. of rodents, and the most common one in humans. Up to 75 million people are estimated to be carriers, and the prevalence among children is as high as 25% in some areas.

This species is able to modulate the human immune system.

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… it is tempting to therapeutically administer further species like H nana, which can generally be left untreated due to their asymptomatic persistence in the host while they are invasive enough to modulate the microenvironment within the intestinal mucosa and have an effect on IBDs. Thus, we suggest that this predominantly indolent human-specific macroparasite may be a candidate to be administered in selected, immunocompetent patients suffering from IBDInflammatory bowel disease is a group of conditions affecting the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, particularly the colon and small intestine. The major types of IBD are Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (UC)., even though there are a few reports about severe complications of H. nanaA species of murine (rat) tapeworm closely related to Hymenolepis diminuta but not suitable for use in therapy because it can reproduce within a host and spread person-to-person. Also known as Dwarf tapeworm. infections in HIV patients and malnourished children. [1]

Notwithstanding the potential for immunomodulation and the typically asymptomatic course of infection by H. nanaA species of murine (rat) tapeworm closely related to Hymenolepis diminuta but not suitable for use in therapy because it can reproduce within a host and spread person-to-person. Also known as Dwarf tapeworm., this species is not suitable for use in therapy because, uniquely among tapewormsA helminth with a flat, ribbon-like, segmented body. Only the murine (rat) tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta, is used in helminthic therapy and this generally does not reach adulthood in humans so requires regular dosing of HDC., it can complete its life cycle in the human small intestine, without the need for an intermediate host. Such autoinfection can persist for years and lead to a high parasiteAn organism that lives in or on another organism (its host) and benefits at the host’s expense. (The organisms used in helminthic therapy are, strictly speaking, not parasites, but mutualists, because they have a mutually beneficial symbiotic relationship with their hosts.) load, especially in immunocompromised hosts.

There is also one case in which a man died when the H. nanaA species of murine (rat) tapeworm closely related to Hymenolepis diminuta but not suitable for use in therapy because it can reproduce within a host and spread person-to-person. Also known as Dwarf tapeworm. he was hosting developed cancer.

For more discussion about this case, see this support group thread.

Hymenolepis diminuta is a much safer rodent tapewormA helminth with a flat, ribbon-like, segmented body. Only the murine (rat) tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta, is used in helminthic therapy and this generally does not reach adulthood in humans so requires regular dosing of HDC. that is widely used in helminthic therapyThe reintroduction to the digestive tract of a controlled number of specially domesticated, mutualistic helminths (intestinal worms) in the form of microscopic eggs or larvae to reconstitute a depleted biome to treat and prevent chronic inflammation, autoimmune disease and other immunological disorders including allergy.. In this case, it is the larval form of the helminth - the cysticercoids - that are self-administered.

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