Helminthic therapy and vaccines

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Can vaccines harm helminthsAn intestinal worm which grows large enough to be seen with the naked eye when mature but which is microscopic when administered in helminthic therapy. [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helminths Wikipedia:Helminths]?

The only suggestion that vaccines might harm helminthsAn intestinal worm which grows large enough to be seen with the naked eye when mature but which is microscopic when administered in helminthic therapy. [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helminths Wikipedia:Helminths] was proposed in posts to the helminthic therapyThe reintroduction to the digestive tract of a controlled number of specially domesticated, mutualistic helminths (intestinal worms) in the form of microscopic eggs or larvae to reconstitute a depleted biome to treat and prevent chronic inflammation, autoimmune disease and other immunological disorders including allergy. support groups and concerned the tetanus vaccine. Three members of the Yahoo Helminthic Therapy forum claimed that they may have lost their hookwormsA helminth that lives in the small intestine. Necator americanus (NA) is the only hookworm species used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin. following tetanus immunisation, although this is by no means certain, and many others have received this vaccine without any loss of worms.

Several other self-treaters have received other vaccines, including flu shots, without any adverse effect on their worms.

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I have had flu vaccine each year with no ill effect to my hookwormsA helminth that lives in the small intestine. Necator americanus (NA) is the only hookworm species used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin.. [1]
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I've gotten one a few times while having HWhookworm, usually referring to the human hookworm, Necator americanus and had no ill effect to my worms. [2]

Considering that people have been deliberately infecting themselves with helminthsAn intestinal worm which grows large enough to be seen with the naked eye when mature but which is microscopic when administered in helminthic therapy. [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helminths Wikipedia:Helminths] since 2004, and that there were an estimated 6,000-7,000 helminth self-treaters in 2015, [3] it is likely that there would have been more reports about this if vaccination were an issue.

The anti-hookwormA helminth that lives in the small intestine. Necator americanus (NA) is the only hookworm species used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin. vaccine

One vaccine that will undoubtedly harm hookwormsA helminth that lives in the small intestine. Necator americanus (NA) is the only hookworm species used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin. is the anti-hookwormA helminth that lives in the small intestine. Necator americanus (NA) is the only hookworm species used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin. vaccine that is currently in clinical development. [4] Unfortunately, not only will an effective hookwormA helminth that lives in the small intestine. Necator americanus (NA) is the only hookworm species used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin. vaccine rid those who take it of their hookwormsA helminth that lives in the small intestine. Necator americanus (NA) is the only hookworm species used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin., it may possibly cause allergic reactions [5] and may also deny its users the opportunity to use controlled therapeutic doses of this species to treat the autoimmune, inflammatory and allergic diseases that will be more likely to appear as a result of the loss from their biomes of this keystone species. [6]

This risk appears not to be on the radar of those involved in the vaccine’s development, but the work of other academics has shown that effective control of exposure to hookwormsA helminth that lives in the small intestine. Necator americanus (NA) is the only hookworm species used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin. could be provided by alternative measures such as the provision of information and education, improvements to basic sanitation and access to safe, clean water, possibly supplemented by periodic deworming, although deworming is also of questionable benefit.

Can helminthsAn intestinal worm which grows large enough to be seen with the naked eye when mature but which is microscopic when administered in helminthic therapy. [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helminths Wikipedia:Helminths] adversely affect vaccine efficacy?

It has been suggested that helminthsAn intestinal worm which grows large enough to be seen with the naked eye when mature but which is microscopic when administered in helminthic therapy. [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helminths Wikipedia:Helminths] might have a detrimental effect on vaccine efficacy, but the available evidence suggests that this is unlikely.

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Immune-modulating parasitesAn organism that lives in or on another organism (its host) and benefits at the host’s expense. (The organisms used in helminthic therapy are, strictly speaking, not parasites, but mutualists, because they have a mutually beneficial symbiotic relationship with their hosts.) (malaria/helminthsAn intestinal worm which grows large enough to be seen with the naked eye when mature but which is microscopic when administered in helminthic therapy. [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helminths Wikipedia:Helminths]) were not associated with reduced immune response to the bivalent HPV-16/18 vaccine. [7]
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Our results do not support the hypothesis that routine anthelminthic treatment during pregnancy has a benefit for the infant's vaccine response… [8]
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…neither helminth infection, nor deworming, appeared to affect previously administered vaccine responsiveness in HIV-1 infected, antiretroviral therapy (ART) naïve, adults in Kenya. [9]

ParasiteAn organism that lives in or on another organism (its host) and benefits at the host’s expense. (The organisms used in helminthic therapy are, strictly speaking, not parasites, but mutualists, because they have a mutually beneficial symbiotic relationship with their hosts.) exposure has been found not to be associated with a reduced response to pneumococcal conjugate vaccine or a malaria transmission blocking vaccine.

The presence of helminthsAn intestinal worm which grows large enough to be seen with the naked eye when mature but which is microscopic when administered in helminthic therapy. [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helminths Wikipedia:Helminths] may actually enhance the beneficial effect of vaccines, as was indicated in one study in which enhanced biodiversity (of worms and bacteria) was shown to be associated with better immune responsiveness, including better responses to vaccination, better T-cell responses, and much higher levels of "natural" antibodies shown to be important in fighting cancer. [10]

Can helminthsAn intestinal worm which grows large enough to be seen with the naked eye when mature but which is microscopic when administered in helminthic therapy. [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helminths Wikipedia:Helminths] help to treat vaccine injuries?

If an autoimmune condition has been triggered by vaccination (for example, SLE or RA [11], or ASIA/Shoenfeld’s Syndrome [12]) this may be amenable to helminthic therapyThe reintroduction to the digestive tract of a controlled number of specially domesticated, mutualistic helminths (intestinal worms) in the form of microscopic eggs or larvae to reconstitute a depleted biome to treat and prevent chronic inflammation, autoimmune disease and other immunological disorders including allergy. in the same way that other autoimmune diseases are.

Another disease that can be triggered by vaccination is Guillain–Barré syndrome, in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks the peripheral nerves and damages their myelin insulation following invasion by a foreign antigen. [13] Since helminthsAn intestinal worm which grows large enough to be seen with the naked eye when mature but which is microscopic when administered in helminthic therapy. [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helminths Wikipedia:Helminths] are able to counter a misdirected immune response, it is conceivable that helminthic therapyThe reintroduction to the digestive tract of a controlled number of specially domesticated, mutualistic helminths (intestinal worms) in the form of microscopic eggs or larvae to reconstitute a depleted biome to treat and prevent chronic inflammation, autoimmune disease and other immunological disorders including allergy. might help in treating this condition.

Until quite recently, medical treatments for Guillain–Barré syndrome and other autoimmune diseases have tended to concentrate on attacking the “bad” effector cells, but a treatment reported in early 2012, and shown to be successful against Guillain–Barré syndrome in rats, increased the "good" regulatory cells. Not only did the sick rats recover much more quickly as a result of this treatment, but those treated prophylactically did not fall ill. [14] The authors of this study point to the fact that their treatment has a similar effect to that observed in patients infected with helminthsAn intestinal worm which grows large enough to be seen with the naked eye when mature but which is microscopic when administered in helminthic therapy. [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helminths Wikipedia:Helminths], both of which approaches regulate the immune system and boost T-cell production in a similar manner.

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