Helminth inoculation

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The first inoculationThe introduction of an infectious agent into an organism. [http://helminthictherapywiki.org/wiki/index.php/Helminth_inoculation Helminth inoculation] should be with a single species

When two species of worm are introduced together by someone who has not previously hosted helminthsAn intestinal worm which grows large enough to be seen with the naked eye when mature but which is microscopic when administered in helminthic therapy. [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helminths Wikipedia:Helminths], or not hosted for some time, the initial immune response may be excessive and the risk of side effects greatly increased.

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I got crazy side effects when I started the HDCHymenolepis diminuta cysticercoids (Hi-men-o-lep'is dim-a-nu-ta sis-ti-sur-koid) - the larval cysts of the rat tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta and NAthe human hookworm, Necator americanus close together. The worm fluThe term commonly used to describe the set of symptoms sometimes experienced initially after inoculation with helminths (especially the hookworm, NA). Some of these symptoms mirror those caused by [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Influenza influenza] - fever, cough, respiratory symptoms, chills, muscle or joint ache, fatigue, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, nausea and vomiting. phase can be brutal if you start them about the same time. [1]
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Irritability, anxiety and agitation were typical symptoms for me when I started HDCHymenolepis diminuta cysticercoids (Hi-men-o-lep'is dim-a-nu-ta sis-ti-sur-koid) - the larval cysts of the rat tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta and NAthe human hookworm, Necator americanus… the combination was too much for me… I really tried for 6-8 weeks and then cancelled the HDCHymenolepis diminuta cysticercoids (Hi-men-o-lep'is dim-a-nu-ta sis-ti-sur-koid) - the larval cysts of the rat tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta. [2]
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I’m one month post inoculationThe introduction of an infectious agent into an organism. [http://helminthictherapywiki.org/wiki/index.php/Helminth_inoculation Helminth inoculation] with 5 HWhookworm, usually referring to the human hookworm, Necator americanus and one week post inoculationThe introduction of an infectious agent into an organism. [http://helminthictherapywiki.org/wiki/index.php/Helminth_inoculation Helminth inoculation] with 2500 TSOthe ova (eggs) of the porcine (pig) whipworm, Trichuris suis. I totally underestimated how bad worm fluThe term commonly used to describe the set of symptoms sometimes experienced initially after inoculation with helminths (especially the hookworm, NA). Some of these symptoms mirror those caused by [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Influenza influenza] - fever, cough, respiratory symptoms, chills, muscle or joint ache, fatigue, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, nausea and vomiting. would feel. It’s hard not to give up. I feel like I’ve been hit by a truck! [3] [4]

If helminthic therapyThe reintroduction to the digestive tract of a controlled number of specially domesticated, mutualistic helminths (intestinal worms) in the form of microscopic eggs or larvae to reconstitute a depleted biome to treat and prevent chronic inflammation, autoimmune disease and other immunological disorders including allergy. is commenced with a single species of worm, and if initial dosing is conservative, any side effects that appear should be mild and transient.

There may be an advantage in adding a second species eventually, but only once the first is well established.

Inoculation is safe, even when the recipient has a cold

Research suggests that helminthsAn intestinal worm which grows large enough to be seen with the naked eye when mature but which is microscopic when administered in helminthic therapy. [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helminths Wikipedia:Helminths] may boost humoral immunity, so inoculationThe introduction of an infectious agent into an organism. [http://helminthictherapywiki.org/wiki/index.php/Helminth_inoculation Helminth inoculation] with appropriately sized doses of therapeutic helminthsAn intestinal worm which grows large enough to be seen with the naked eye when mature but which is microscopic when administered in helminthic therapy. [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helminths Wikipedia:Helminths] might actually be helpful if taken while suffering from a cold or the flu. However, chronic infections may be exacerbated temporarily by inoculationThe introduction of an infectious agent into an organism. [http://helminthictherapywiki.org/wiki/index.php/Helminth_inoculation Helminth inoculation], especially the first time that a helminth is introduced.

Inoculation with NAthe human hookworm, Necator americanus

NAthe human hookworm, Necator americanus larvaeThe active immature form of an insect, or an animal such as a helminth, which develops from an egg and eventually transforms again into its adult state. are applied to the skin on a bandage/dressing and should be used as soon as they are available.

They can survive for as long as 3-5 months if kept at a favourable temperature (70ºF/21ºC), although their longevity is also dependent on the temperature at which their were incubated, with larvaeThe active immature form of an insect, or an animal such as a helminth, which develops from an egg and eventually transforms again into its adult state. grown at a lower temperature surviving for longer. Since they do not feed at this stage in their development, the larvaeThe active immature form of an insect, or an animal such as a helminth, which develops from an egg and eventually transforms again into its adult state. are reliant on their fat stores, which obviously diminish over time, rendering them progressively weaker.

After being pipetted onto a bandage/dressing, the hookwormA helminth that lives in the small intestine. Necator americanus (NA) is the only hookworm species used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin. larvaeThe active immature form of an insect, or an animal such as a helminth, which develops from an egg and eventually transforms again into its adult state. should be applied to a hairless, convex area of skin to ensure good skin contact, as demonstrated in the following instructional video.

There can be stragglers trapped in water droplets in the vial after the contents have been pipetted onto a bandage/dressing, so at least one rinse should be carried out. Some providers supply a second vial of distilled water for this purpose. Even a second rinse can capture the odd straggler. [5]

If inoculating with home-grown larvaeThe active immature form of an insect, or an animal such as a helminth, which develops from an egg and eventually transforms again into its adult state., use a bandage/dressing with a flat central pad in preference to the quilted type. A Band-Aid dressing with a ⚠️"Quilt-Aid Comfort Pad" has been reported to have prevented successful inoculationThe introduction of an infectious agent into an organism. [http://helminthictherapywiki.org/wiki/index.php/Helminth_inoculation Helminth inoculation] in one case. [6]

If a ready-made bandage/dressing is not available, an effective substitute can be made by cutting the required size from a large lint pad and securing this to the skin with medical tape. [7]. Alternatively, a piece of toilet paper, or flat paper towel, stuck to a piece of masking/painter's tape will work. [8] [9]

Some hookwormA helminth that lives in the small intestine. Necator americanus (NA) is the only hookworm species used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin. suppliers have experimented with pre-loading the larvaeThe active immature form of an insect, or an animal such as a helminth, which develops from an egg and eventually transforms again into its adult state. onto a small damp cotton patch, which needs to be placed onto a larger bandage/dressing after receipt, before being applied to the skin. So far, this method has proved to be less successful than the traditional method requiring the self-treaterSomeone who treats their own disease or condition without medical assistance. to pipette the larvaeThe active immature form of an insect, or an animal such as a helminth, which develops from an egg and eventually transforms again into its adult state. from an eppendorf tube onto a bandage/dressing, but, for those who do receive a pre-loaded patch, this can be applied as demonstrated in the following video.

After the bandage/dressing has been applied, the larvaeThe active immature form of an insect, or an animal such as a helminth, which develops from an egg and eventually transforms again into its adult state. will detect the presence of skin [10] [11] and, responding in particular to warmth, [12] will swing into action, often producing an itch within just a few minutes. Occasionally, the itch may be delayed for up to several hours. [13]

The bandage/dressing should be left in place for a minimum of four hours and, ideally, for twelve hours. If you need to take a shower before the bandage/dressing is due to come off, cut a piece from a plastic bag and tape this over the area to keep it dry. [14] Duct tape or electrical insulation tape are ideal for this purpose because they are waterproof.

When the bandage is removed, this may reveal the beginnings of a rash. For more about this and how to treat the itch, see the following page.

Best time of day to inoculate with NAthe human hookworm, Necator americanus

Different self-treaters prefer to inoculate at different times during the day.

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I get a very aggressive itch, so I always inoculate in the morning. This way, I can distract myself during the day. I take the bandage/dressing off before I retire for the night, and take my hair dryer to bed with me. [15]
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I like to inoculate at night because I sleep through the itch! I hair dryer in the morning. [16]

Body sites used for hookwormA helminth that lives in the small intestine. Necator americanus (NA) is the only hookworm species used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin. inoculationThe introduction of an infectious agent into an organism. [http://helminthictherapywiki.org/wiki/index.php/Helminth_inoculation Helminth inoculation]

The inside of the forearm or bicep is a good choice because it is convenient to access in order to treat the rash with creams or apply hot air from a hair dryer, but inoculationThe introduction of an infectious agent into an organism. [http://helminthictherapywiki.org/wiki/index.php/Helminth_inoculation Helminth inoculation] too close to the armpit can cause lymph nodes there to swell. Inoculation high on the inner thigh - and even occasionally on the outer thigh [17] - can cause painfully raised lymph nodes in the groin, which can be uncomfortable when walking. [18]

Many hookwormA helminth that lives in the small intestine. Necator americanus (NA) is the only hookworm species used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin. hosts have found that repeatedly using the same site results in a more robust skin reaction, and that varying the site effectively reduces both the rash and the itching.

Sites that have been used include the following, starting with the feet and moving up to the shoulder.

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I put mine on the instep/arch of my foot. I did not have any histamine reaction. No bumps, no itching. [19] (Although someone else who tried this location has said, "Never again"! [20])
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I have inocculated with NAthe human hookworm, Necator americanus 5 weeks ago and my foot was so swollen that I couldn't walk. [21]
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I like to do ankles. [22]
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I did inside my ankle so I could scratch with the other foot. [23]
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3 days after inoculationThe introduction of an infectious agent into an organism. [http://helminthictherapywiki.org/wiki/index.php/Helminth_inoculation Helminth inoculation] i can barely walk...guess i shouldn’t have done it on my ankle. [24]
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Worst rash I've had was on my arm, smallest on my ankle. [25]
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Calf. [26]
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I put them somewhere that isn't hard to scratch. Down on my calf I'd be bent over all day long. [27]
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I've been inoculating into different areas on my knees. I have OA in my knees. No rash at all. [28]
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It always itches badly, but say the most sensitive places such as inner lower arm and inner calf (not to mention the hollow of the knee :-o ) are "10" on the itching scale, then the middle of the thigh, or slightly above the knee, is "7" or "8"... [29]
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Inner thigh a few inches above my knee. [30]
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I did my second dose on my thigh and that worked fine. [31]
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I use somewhere on my legs because it's easier to hide under clothes. I always get an awfully itchy itch -- but slightly less when using the upper parts of the leg. [32]
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Top of the upper leg is best for me. Less visible. [33]
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Since it's summer, I think I'm going for left thigh or hip this time. [34]
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I always do my stomach. [35]
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I've done my thigh but much prefer my arm as the itch seems more managable. [36]
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I always use the place on my inner arm halfway between my elbow and wrist, because it's flat and smooth... The forearm can easily be covered with a light sleeve but also quickly accessed for airing out or changing dressing. [37]
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I prefer the inner left forearm because I’m right handed and this makes applying anti-itch cream easier. [38]
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I did 2 on my thigh then switched to my arm. I've found that the closer to my armpit, the faster it heals, and generally my arms heal faster than my legs. [39]
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I started inoculating high on my shoulder because I sleep on my side, and that part is always squished against and rubbing around on the bed, and plus not very sensitive, so the itch is quite bearable. [40]

One site that should be avoided is the thumb!

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When I was doing my inoculationThe introduction of an infectious agent into an organism. [http://helminthictherapywiki.org/wiki/index.php/Helminth_inoculation Helminth inoculation], I accidentally dropped a drop of water onto my thumb and just wiped it off, but it was ridiculously painful the night I inoculated. Since then it's been like a big red boil - literally a throbbing cartoon thumb! Its been 6 days now and it's still kinda sore. I definitely don't recommend inoculationThe introduction of an infectious agent into an organism. [http://helminthictherapywiki.org/wiki/index.php/Helminth_inoculation Helminth inoculation] around the skin of the thumb nails! (Via private message.)

Oral inoculationThe introduction of an infectious agent into an organism. [http://helminthictherapywiki.org/wiki/index.php/Helminth_inoculation Helminth inoculation] with NAthe human hookworm, Necator americanus is not recommended

There are several reasons why it is not recommended to swallow NAthe human hookworm, Necator americanus larvaeThe active immature form of an insect, or an animal such as a helminth, which develops from an egg and eventually transforms again into its adult state..

1. While oral inoculationThe introduction of an infectious agent into an organism. [http://helminthictherapywiki.org/wiki/index.php/Helminth_inoculation Helminth inoculation] has been shown to be effective with some hookwormA helminth that lives in the small intestine. Necator americanus (NA) is the only hookworm species used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin. species, such as the dog hookwormA helminth that lives in the small intestine. Necator americanus (NA) is the only hookworm species used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin., Ancylostoma caninum, [41] and the human hookwormA helminth that lives in the small intestine. Necator americanus (NA) is the only hookworm species used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin., Ancylostoma duodenaleA species of roundworm, aka the Old World hookworm, that is "not" used in helminthic therapy. [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancylostoma_duodenale Wikipedia:Ancylostoma duodenale], [42] oral inoculationThe introduction of an infectious agent into an organism. [http://helminthictherapywiki.org/wiki/index.php/Helminth_inoculation Helminth inoculation] with Necator americanusThe species of human hookworm used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin. has been found to be ineffective, possibly because passage through the lungs is omitted.

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N. americanus may require a period of growth in the lungs, which is not required by A. duodenale. This deduction is based on the observation that development of N. americanus following oral infection rarely succeeds and, even then, very few worms develop… the apparent inability of N. americanus to do this is thought to be attributable to an obligate pneumonic phase in its life history. [43]

2. L3 hookwormA helminth that lives in the small intestine. Necator americanus (NA) is the only hookworm species used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin. larvaeThe active immature form of an insect, or an animal such as a helminth, which develops from an egg and eventually transforms again into its adult state. are particularly susceptible to acid, so there must be some developmental change that occurs during the few days that they normally take to travel from the skin to the stomach which enables them to survive the harsh, acidic gastric environment. Hotez and colleagues have reported that, following entry into the host via the skin, L3 larvaeThe active immature form of an insect, or an animal such as a helminth, which develops from an egg and eventually transforms again into its adult state. receive a signal present in mammalian blood and tissue that causes them to resume development and secrete bioactive polypeptides. [44] [45] Larvae that are swallowed will obviously not experience this trigger.

3. HookwormsA helminth that lives in the small intestine. Necator americanus (NA) is the only hookworm species used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin. have probably taken the same route throughout most of their long co-evolution with mankind, so they are likely to try to follow the same pathway irrespective of where they actually enter the body. Therefore, unless they are encapsulated, larvaeThe active immature form of an insect, or an animal such as a helminth, which develops from an egg and eventually transforms again into its adult state. that are swallowed may still be looking for skin, and might mistake the lining of the mouth or throat for external skin and enter via these surfaces. Nagahana, et al., have reported that N. americanus L3 larvaeThe active immature form of an insect, or an animal such as a helminth, which develops from an egg and eventually transforms again into its adult state. will invade the buccal epithelium if they enter through the mouth. (Nagahana M, et al. Experimental studies on the oral infection of Necator americanusThe species of human hookworm used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin.. III. Experimental infection of three cases of human beings with Necator americanusThe species of human hookworm used in helminthic therapy. Its microscopic larvae are applied periodically to the skin. larvaeThe active immature form of an insect, or an animal such as a helminth, which develops from an egg and eventually transforms again into its adult state. through the mucous membrane of the mouth. Japanese Journal of Parasitology. 1963;12:162–167.) Since some people experience significant swelling at the inoculationThe introduction of an infectious agent into an organism. [http://helminthictherapywiki.org/wiki/index.php/Helminth_inoculation Helminth inoculation] site, there is a potential for blockage of the throat if larvaeThe active immature form of an insect, or an animal such as a helminth, which develops from an egg and eventually transforms again into its adult state. were swallowed.

4. Oral inoculationThe introduction of an infectious agent into an organism. [http://helminthictherapywiki.org/wiki/index.php/Helminth_inoculation Helminth inoculation] does not provide the visible confirmation of dose viability that is common with successful percutaneous inoculationThe introduction of an infectious agent into an organism. [http://helminthictherapywiki.org/wiki/index.php/Helminth_inoculation Helminth inoculation]. So, unless the worms have been cultured by the person inoculating, or they have a microscope with which to check the viability of doses received from other sources, they might unknowingly swallow a dose of dead worms, which could delay the progress of their treatment.

Possible side effects after inoculationThe introduction of an infectious agent into an organism. [http://helminthictherapywiki.org/wiki/index.php/Helminth_inoculation Helminth inoculation] with NAthe human hookworm, Necator americanus

See the following pages.

See also

Inoculation with TTOthe ova (eggs) of the human whipworm, Trichuris trichiura

TTOthe ova (eggs) of the human whipworm, Trichuris trichiura are taken orally in a drink.

Possible side effects after inoculationThe introduction of an infectious agent into an organism. [http://helminthictherapywiki.org/wiki/index.php/Helminth_inoculation Helminth inoculation] with TTOthe ova (eggs) of the human whipworm, Trichuris trichiura

See the following page section.

Inoculation with TSOthe ova (eggs) of the porcine (pig) whipworm, Trichuris suis

TSOthe ova (eggs) of the porcine (pig) whipworm, Trichuris suis are taken orally in a drink.

Possible side effects after inoculationThe introduction of an infectious agent into an organism. [http://helminthictherapywiki.org/wiki/index.php/Helminth_inoculation Helminth inoculation] with TSOthe ova (eggs) of the porcine (pig) whipworm, Trichuris suis

See the following page section.

Inoculation with HDCHymenolepis diminuta cysticercoids (Hi-men-o-lep'is dim-a-nu-ta sis-ti-sur-koid) - the larval cysts of the rat tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta

HDCHymenolepis diminuta cysticercoids (Hi-men-o-lep'is dim-a-nu-ta sis-ti-sur-koid) - the larval cysts of the rat tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta are taken orally in a drink, preferably something containing fat to help promote the growth of the cysticerciThe larval (immature) stage of a tapeworm.. Milk will work well, or a single fish oil capsule can be taken with any other liquid.

Possible side effects after inoculationThe introduction of an infectious agent into an organism. [http://helminthictherapywiki.org/wiki/index.php/Helminth_inoculation Helminth inoculation] with HDCHymenolepis diminuta cysticercoids (Hi-men-o-lep'is dim-a-nu-ta sis-ti-sur-koid) - the larval cysts of the rat tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta

See the following page section.

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